Elevated CO2 alters larval proteome and its phosphorylation status in the commercial oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis
[Dineshram, R.; Thiyagarajan, V.; Lane, Ackley; Leung, Priscilla T. Y.] Univ Hong Kong, Swire Inst Marine Sci, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China; Leung, Priscilla T. Y.] Univ Hong Kong, Sch Biol Sci, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China; [Yu Ziniu; Shu Xiao] Chinese Acad Sci, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China; rajan@hku.hk
2013
发表期刊MARINE BIOLOGY
ISSN0025-3162
卷号160期号:8页码:2189-2205
摘要Ocean acidification (OA) is beginning to have noticeable negative impact on calcification rate, shell structure and physiological energy budgeting of several marine organisms; these alter the growth of many economically important shellfish including oysters. Early life stages of oysters may be particularly vulnerable to OA-driven low pH conditions because their shell is made up of the highly soluble form of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) mineral, aragonite. Our long-term CO2 perturbation experiment showed that larval shell growth rate of the oyster species Crassostrea hongkongensis was significantly reduced at pH < 7.9 compared to the control (8.2). To gain new insights into the underlying mechanisms of low-pH-induced delays in larval growth, we have examined the effect of pH on the protein expression pattern, including protein phosphorylation status at the pediveliger larval stage. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that the larval proteome was significantly altered by the two low pH treatments (7.9 and 7.6) compared to the control pH (8.2). Generally, the number of expressed proteins and their phosphorylation level decreased with low pH. Proteins involved in larval energy metabolism and calcification appeared to be down-regulated in response to low pH, whereas cell motility and production of cytoskeletal proteins were increased. This study on larval growth coupled with proteome change is the first step toward the search for novel Protein Expression Signatures indicative of low pH, which may help in understanding the mechanisms involved in low pH tolerance.
部门归属LMB
学科领域Marine & Freshwater Biology
资助者We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004). ; We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004). ; We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004). ; We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004).
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资助者We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004). ; We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004). ; We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004). ; We are grateful to PY Qian (HKUST, Hong Kong), Gray Williams and Kenneth Leung (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) for their constant support during the course of this project. Authors also thank Sam Dupont (University of Gothenburg) and Hans-Otto Portner (Alfred Wegener Institute) for their critical editorial comments and efforts to coordinate this special issue on ocean acidification. We thank Mr. Fu for his technical assistance with the experimental setup at the hatchery. The oyster larval culture facilities located in Zhanjiang (China) hatchery were partially funded by the 973 program to Ziniu Yu. This study was primarily supported by a research grant from the HKSAR-RGC (No. 778309 M) and the Area of Excellency project (No. AoE/P-04/2004).
WOS记录号WOS:000323066600035
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被引频次:27[WOS]   [WOS记录]     [WOS相关记录]
文献类型期刊论文
条目标识符http://ir.scsio.ac.cn/handle/344004/11002
专题中科院海洋生物资源可持续利用重点实验室
通讯作者rajan@hku.hk
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[Dineshram, R.,Thiyagarajan, V.,Lane, Ackley,et al. Elevated CO2 alters larval proteome and its phosphorylation status in the commercial oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis[J]. MARINE BIOLOGY,2013,160(8):2189-2205.
APA [Dineshram, R..,Thiyagarajan, V..,Lane, Ackley.,Leung, Priscilla T. Y.] Univ Hong Kong, Swire Inst Marine Sci, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.,Leung, Priscilla T. Y.] Univ Hong Kong, Sch Biol Sci, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.,...&rajan@hku.hk.(2013).Elevated CO2 alters larval proteome and its phosphorylation status in the commercial oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.MARINE BIOLOGY,160(8),2189-2205.
MLA [Dineshram, R.,et al."Elevated CO2 alters larval proteome and its phosphorylation status in the commercial oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis".MARINE BIOLOGY 160.8(2013):2189-2205.
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