SCSIO OpenIR  > 中科院边缘海地质重点实验室
Macrobioerosion in Porites corals in subtropical northern South China Sea: a limiting factor for high-latitude reef framework development
[Chen, Tianran; Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu] Chinese Acad Sci, Key Lab Marginal Sea Geol, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Guangzhou 510301, Guangdong, Peoples R China; chentianran@scsio.ac.cn
2013
Source PublicationCORAL REEFS
ISSN0722-4028
Volume32Issue:1Pages:101-108
AbstractBioerosion is an important limiting factor in carbonate accretion and reef framework development; however, few studies have quantified the direct impact of macroborers on high-latitude coral communities, which are viewed as potential refuge during a period of global warming. In this study, internal macrobioerosion of Porites corals was examined at Daya Bay, subtropical northern South China Sea. The principal borers were the bivalve Lithophaga spp. and the sponges Cliona spp. and Cliothosa spp. (a parts per thousand yen80 %), while sipunculid and polychaete worms and barnacles accounted for small amounts of bioerosion (a parts per thousand currency sign20 %). Porites corals were heavily bioeroded in areas impacted by aquacultural and urban activities (10.34-27.55 %) compared with corals in relatively unpolluted areas (2.18-6.76 %). High levels of bioerosion, especially boring bivalve infestation, significantly weaken the corals and increase their susceptibility to dislodgement and fragmentation in typhoons, limiting accumulation of limestone framework. This study implies that carbonate accretion and reef development for high-latitude coral communities may be limited in future high-CO2 and eutrophication-stressed environments.
Department海洋地质
KeywordBioerosion Porites High-latitude Non-reefal Coral Communities Northern South China Sea
Subject AreaMarine & Freshwater Biology
Funding OrganizationWe deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054). ; We deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054). ; We deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054). ; We deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054).
URL查看原文
Language英语
Funding OrganizationWe deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054). ; We deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054). ; We deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054). ; We deeply thank Dr. Joshua Feingold and an anonymous reviewer. Their comments and suggestions significantly improved the manuscript. This work was funded by the "Strategic Priority Research Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05080300) and the National Science Foundation of China (40830852, 41025007 and 41106054).
WOS IDWOS:000316018600013
Citation statistics
Cited Times:8[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.scsio.ac.cn/handle/344004/11136
Collection中科院边缘海地质重点实验室
Corresponding Authorchentianran@scsio.ac.cn
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
[Chen, Tianran,Li, Shu,Yu, Kefu] Chinese Acad Sci, Key Lab Marginal Sea Geol, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Guangzhou 510301, Guangdong, Peoples R China,et al. Macrobioerosion in Porites corals in subtropical northern South China Sea: a limiting factor for high-latitude reef framework development[J]. CORAL REEFS,2013,32(1):101-108.
APA [Chen, Tianran,Li, Shu,Yu, Kefu] Chinese Acad Sci, Key Lab Marginal Sea Geol, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Guangzhou 510301, Guangdong, Peoples R China,&chentianran@scsio.ac.cn.(2013).Macrobioerosion in Porites corals in subtropical northern South China Sea: a limiting factor for high-latitude reef framework development.CORAL REEFS,32(1),101-108.
MLA [Chen, Tianran,et al."Macrobioerosion in Porites corals in subtropical northern South China Sea: a limiting factor for high-latitude reef framework development".CORAL REEFS 32.1(2013):101-108.
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Related Services
Recommend this item
Bookmark
Usage statistics
Export to Endnote
Terms of Use
No data!
Social Bookmark/Share
All comments (0)
No comment.
 

Items in the repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.