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Rh protein expression in branchial neuroepithelial cells, and the role of ammonia in ventilatory control in fish
Zhang, Li1; Nawata, C. Michele1; De Boeck, Gudrun1; Wood, Chris M.1; woodcm@zoology.ubc.ca
2015
Source PublicationCOMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
Volume186Pages:39-51
AbstractBill Milsom has made seminal contributions to our understanding of ventilatory control in a wide range of vertebrates. Teleosts are particularly interesting, because they produce a 3rd, potentially toxic respiratory gas (ammonia) in large amounts. Fish are well known to hyperventilate under high environmental ammonia (HEA), but only recently has the potential role of ammonia in normal ventilatory control been investigated. It is now clear that ammonia can act directly as a ventilatory stimulant in trout, independent of its effects on acid-base balance. Even in ureotelic dogfish sharks, acute elevations in ammonia cause increases in ventilation. Peripherally, the detection of elevated ammonia resides in gill arches I and II in trout, and in vitro, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) from these arches are sensitive to ammonia, responding with elevations in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+](i)). Centrally, hyperventilatory responses to ammonia correlate more closely with concentrations of ammonia in the brain than in plasma or CSF. After chronic HEA exposure, ventilatory responsiveness to ammonia is lost, associated with both an attenuation of the [Ca2+](i); response in NECs, and the absence of elevation in brain ammonia concentration. Chronic exposure to HEA also causes increases in the mRNA expression of several Rh proteins (ammonia-conductive channels) in both brain and gills. "Single cell" PCR techniques have been used to isolate the individual responses of NECs versus other gill cell types. We suggest several circumstances (post-feeding, post-exercise) where the role of ammonia as a ventilatory stimulant may have adaptive benefits for O-2 uptake in fish. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
DepartmentLMB
KeywordAmmonia Teleost Fish Elasmobranchs Chemoreceptors Rhesus Glycoproteins Neuroepithelial Cells Ventilation Brain 1st Gill Arch Serotonin
Subject AreaBiochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Physiology ; Zoology
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.scsio.ac.cn/handle/344004/14796
Collection中科院海洋生物资源可持续利用重点实验室
Corresponding Authorwoodcm@zoology.ubc.ca
Affiliation1.[Zhang, Li
2.Nawata, C. Michele
3.Wood, Chris M.] McMaster Univ, Dept Biol, Hamilton, ON, Canada
4.[Zhang, Li] South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Key Lab Marine Bioresources Sustainable Utilizat, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China
5.[Nawata, C. Michele] Univ Arizona, Dept Physiol, Tucson, AZ USA
6.[Nawata, C. Michele
7.De Boeck, Gudrun
8.Wood, Chris M.] Bamfield Marine Sci Ctr, Bamfield, BC, Canada
9.[De Boeck, Gudrun] Univ Antwerp, Dept Biol, SPHERE, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium
10.[Wood, Chris M.] Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Zhang, Li,Nawata, C. Michele,De Boeck, Gudrun,et al. Rh protein expression in branchial neuroepithelial cells, and the role of ammonia in ventilatory control in fish[J]. COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY,2015,186:39-51.
APA Zhang, Li,Nawata, C. Michele,De Boeck, Gudrun,Wood, Chris M.,&woodcm@zoology.ubc.ca.(2015).Rh protein expression in branchial neuroepithelial cells, and the role of ammonia in ventilatory control in fish.COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY,186,39-51.
MLA Zhang, Li,et al."Rh protein expression in branchial neuroepithelial cells, and the role of ammonia in ventilatory control in fish".COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY 186(2015):39-51.
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