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Methane source linked to gas hydrate system at hydrate drilling areas of the South China Sea: Porewater geochemistry and numerical model constraints
Hu, Yu; Luo, Min1; Chen, Linying; Liang, Qianyong2; Feng, Dong3,4; Tao, Jun2; Yang, Shengxiong2; Chen, Duofu4
2018
Source PublicationJOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES
ISSN1367-9120
Volume168Pages:87
AbstractMethane of various origins is widespread in the sediments of continental margins, representing a key component of the carbon cycle in the ocean. Its occurrence in shallow marine sediments can be linked to the gas hydrate reservoir in the deep sedimentary column. However, this type of methane is difficult to track due to complex reactions occurred during its long distance migration. Porewater geochemical analyses of two similar to 7 m piston cores (D17-15 and W01-16) combined with a reaction-transport model were applied to quantify methane-related biogeochemical processes and to explore the linkage of shallow methane to gas hydrate reservoir in the hydrate drilling areas of Shenhu and Dongsha in the South China Sea (SCS). The model results revealed that anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is the predominant biogeochemical process in both cores, consuming approximately 85% and 74% of sulfate in the modeled domain, respectively. The crossplot of dissolve inorganic carbon (DIC) accumulation versus sulfate depletion of the system suggests that methane consumed during the AOM is mainly originated from external methane sources rather than local methanogenesis. Using a delta C-13(DIC) mass balance calculation together with model-derived fractions of different DIC sources, we estimated that the delta C-13 value of the external methane in core D17-15 is -66.6%o, which is in accordance with the previous reported delta C-13 values of hydrate-bound methane in the area. These results suggest that methane consumed in shallow sediments in the hydrate drilling areas of the SCS is mainly originated from local gas hydrate reservoir. The proposed approach has the potential to be used to differentiate the sources of methane, which will provide constraints on dynamics of methane in gas hydrate-bearing marine sediments.
DepartmentMSG
KeywordMethane Anaerobic oxidation of methane Porewater Gas hydrate South China Sea
DOI10.1016/j.jseaes.2018.04.028
Citation statistics
Cited Times:4[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.scsio.ac.cn/handle/344004/17665
Collection中科院边缘海地质重点实验室
Affiliation1.Shanghai Ocean Univ, Coll Marine Sci, Shanghai Engn Res Ctr Hadal Sci & Technol, Shanghai 201306, Peoples R China
2.Qingdao Natl Lab Marine Sci & Technol, Lab Marine Geol, Qingdao 266061, Peoples R China
3.Guangzhou Marine Geol Survey, MLR Key Lab Marine Mineral Resources, Guangzhou 510075, Guangdong, Peoples R China
4.Chinese Acad Sci, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, CAS Key Lab Ocean & Marginal Sea Geol, Guangzhou 510301, Guangdong, Peoples R China
5.Qingdao Natl Lab Marine Sci & Technol, Lab Marine Mineral Resources, Qingdao 266237, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Hu, Yu,Luo, Min,Chen, Linying,et al. Methane source linked to gas hydrate system at hydrate drilling areas of the South China Sea: Porewater geochemistry and numerical model constraints[J]. JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES,2018,168:87, 95.
APA Hu, Yu.,Luo, Min.,Chen, Linying.,Liang, Qianyong.,Feng, Dong.,...&Chen, Duofu.(2018).Methane source linked to gas hydrate system at hydrate drilling areas of the South China Sea: Porewater geochemistry and numerical model constraints.JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES,168,87.
MLA Hu, Yu,et al."Methane source linked to gas hydrate system at hydrate drilling areas of the South China Sea: Porewater geochemistry and numerical model constraints".JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES 168(2018):87.
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