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Mechanisms for Temperature Modulation of Feeding in Goldfish and Implications on Seasonal Changes in Feeding Behavior and Food Intake
Chen, Ting1; Wong, Matthew K. H.; Chan, Ben C. B.; Wong, Anderson O. L.
2019
Source PublicationFRONTIERS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY
ISSN1664-2392
Volume10Pages:133
AbstractIn fish models, seasonal change in feeding is under the influence of water temperature. However, the effects of temperature on appetite control can vary among fish species and the mechanisms involved have not been fully characterized. Using goldfish (Carassius auratus) as a model, seasonal changes in feeding behavior and food intake were examined in cyprinid species. In our study, foraging activity and food consumption in goldfish were found to be reduced with positive correlation to the gradual drop in water temperature occurring during the transition from summer (28.4 +/- 2.2 degrees C) to winter (15.1 +/- 2.6 degrees C). In goldfish with a 4-week acclimation at 28 degrees C, their foraging activity and food consumption were notably higher than their counterparts with similar acclimation at 15 degrees C. When compared to the group at 28 degrees C during summer, the attenuation in feeding responses at 15 degrees C during the winter also occurred with parallel rises of leptin I and II mRNA levels in the liver. Meanwhile, a drop in orexin mRNA along with concurrent elevations of CCK, MCH, POMC, CART, and leptin receptor (LepR) transcript expression could be noted in brain areas involved in feeding control. In short-term study, goldfish acclimated at 28 degrees C were exposed to 15 degrees C for 24 h and the treatment was effective in reducing foraging activity and food intake. The opposite was true in reciprocal experiment with a rise in water temperature to 28 degrees C for goldfish acclimated at 15 degrees C. In parallel time-course study with lowering of water temperature from 28 to 15 degrees C, short-term exposure (6-12 h) of goldfish to 15 degrees C could also increase leptin I and II mRNA levels in the liver. Similar to our seasonality study, transcript level of orexin was reduced along with up-regulation of CCK, MCH, POMC, CART, and LepR gene expression in different brain areas. Our results, as a whole, suggest that temperature-driven regulation of leptin output from the liver in conjunction with parallel modulations of orexigenic/anorexigenic signals and leptin responsiveness in the brain may contribute to the seasonal changes of feeding behavior and food intake observed in goldfish.
DepartmentLMB
Keywordappetite control feeding behavior temperature change leptin and leptin receptor orexigenic factors anorexigenic factors goldfish
DOI10.3389/fendo.2019.00133
Citation statistics
Cited Times:4[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.scsio.ac.cn/handle/344004/17878
Collection中科院海洋生物资源可持续利用重点实验室
Affiliation1.[Chen, Ting; Wong, Matthew K. H.; Chan, Ben C. B.; Wong, Anderson O. L.] Univ Hong Kong, Sch Biol Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Appl Marine Biol, CAS Key Lab Trop Marine Bioresources & Ecol, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Chen, Ting,Wong, Matthew K. H.,Chan, Ben C. B.,et al. Mechanisms for Temperature Modulation of Feeding in Goldfish and Implications on Seasonal Changes in Feeding Behavior and Food Intake[J]. FRONTIERS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY,2019,10:133.
APA Chen, Ting,Wong, Matthew K. H.,Chan, Ben C. B.,&Wong, Anderson O. L..(2019).Mechanisms for Temperature Modulation of Feeding in Goldfish and Implications on Seasonal Changes in Feeding Behavior and Food Intake.FRONTIERS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY,10,133.
MLA Chen, Ting,et al."Mechanisms for Temperature Modulation of Feeding in Goldfish and Implications on Seasonal Changes in Feeding Behavior and Food Intake".FRONTIERS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY 10(2019):133.
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